ChBE Fall 2020 Virtual Seminar, “Bottom-up assembly of Polymeric Materials: Synthesis, Integration, and Applications”

Join the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering for the Fall 2020 Virtual Seminar on November 11, 2020 from 3:35 p.m.-4:50 p.m. featuring Dr. Siamak Nejati, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Title: Bottom-up assembly of Polymeric Materials: Synthesis, Integration, and Applications

When: November 11, 2020 from 3:35 p.m.-4:50 p.m.

Where: Virtual event on Zoom. ChBE – Sohail Murad, (Chair) is inviting you to Join Zoom Seminar
Join Zoom Meeting
https://iit-edu.zoom.us/j/86215327612?pwd=V1J2N042OTJvbFRQd0psczU1ekk2dz09

Meeting ID: 862 1532 7612
Passcode: 361814
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+13126266799,,86215327612#,,,,,,0#,,361814# US (Chicago)

 

Siamak Nejati.jpg

Siamak Nejati

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Abstract

The vapor phase polymerization (VPP) is a versatile approach f polymerization techniques. The last decade of development in VPP has shown the promises of these methods for creating stoichiometric polymeric coatings that can be applied to a variety of materials and structures. Here, I will discuss initiated and oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD/oCVD). In iCVD and oCVD, the adsorption of reactive species is typically the rate-limiting step. As a result, the polymer growth and properties can be tuned by adjusting the surface availability of the reactants. In this work, I will start with a general introduction into materials processing and the challenges with controlling soft materials structure. Then I will demonstrate how iCVD and oCVD can be utilized for the synthesis and integration of polymeric materials within the high aspect ratio structures. I will highlight the exceptional coating resolution that can be achieved through these methods. Then, I will discuss the importance of processing conditions on the chemical properties of the synthesized materials.

Further, I present an unexplored dimension that can allow for the fine-tuning of materials properties. I will discuss the importance of developing bottom-up approaches for assembling ordered organic materials for the desired applications in electrocatalysis and separation. In the end, I will share the opportunities that are remained to be explored for the growth and synthesis of well-defined organic materials and interfaces with the designed and programmable architectures.

Short Biography

Dr. Siamak Nejati is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He received his Ph.D. from Drexel University in 2013. His research is focused on materials development for the challenges at the water-energy nexus. He plans to develop precise and bottom-up approaches for the engineering and assembly of soft matter with tunable physical and chemical properties